Hurricane Andrew photos remain startling reminders of storms


It’s been 30 years since the landfall for Hurricane Andrew, but the photos are still as startling and breathtaking as ever.They’ve made their mark in history and many are recognizable for the damage associated with how powerful hurricanes can be.WATCH: WPBF 25 First Warning Weather: Surviving The StormLance Waters, a photojournalist for the Palm Beach Post, had chartered a plane to get to the Keys during the storm. The forecast changed after they took off, so they ended up landing in Marathon.He said they could see people trying to evacuate from the Keys and ending up stuck on A1A from their plane.”These are people evacuating and you can see, I think, how slow the traffic’s moving because people are standing outside their cars,” Waters said. “Wow, that was intense.”The enormity of the storm hit when Waters and his reporter entered Florida City after the storm. There was hardly anyone — just damage.”And then we came across the Goalcoast Mobile Home Park,” Waters said. “Outside the walls, you could tell the place was flattened. We found the entrance and went in and couldn’t find anyone at first … and saw in the distance some movement. So we went and tracked down Gary Davis, who was standing outside his mobile home wearing a plastic trash bag holding Boo Boo, one of his two chihuahuas.”Waters said the photo is iconic as it shows the devastation caused by the hurricane and the daze on Davis’ face from surviving.’It looked like an atom bomb’: Hurricane Andrew’s impact on Homestead Air Force Base Photojournalist John Lopinot placed other editors throughout Florida for the hurricane in order to be prepared for landfall. He shot damage from the air.When WPBF 25 News Anchor Tiffany Kenney asked him if he had ever seen anything like it, he said, “No, and I had covered hurricanes all over for the paper and it was nothing like this.”The flattened roofs, demolished roadways, snapped concrete polls, and destroyed houses were everywhere, Lopinot said. Both photojournalists said the teamwork proved that they weren’t only a wonderful group of journalists, but also human beings.Informational: 2022 WPBF 25 First Warning Weather Hurricane Survival Guide

It’s been 30 years since the landfall for Hurricane Andrew, but the photos are still as startling and breathtaking as ever.

They’ve made their mark in history and many are recognizable for the damage associated with how powerful hurricanes can be.

WATCH: WPBF 25 First Warning Weather: Surviving The Storm

Lance Waters, a photojournalist for the Palm Beach Post, had chartered a plane to get to the Keys during the storm. The forecast changed after they took off, so they ended up landing in Marathon.

He said they could see people trying to evacuate from the Keys and ending up stuck on A1A from their plane.

“These are people evacuating and you can see, I think, how slow the traffic’s moving because people are standing outside their cars,” Waters said. “Wow, that was intense.”

The Palm Beach Post

People evacuating before Hurricane Andrew

The enormity of the storm hit when Waters and his reporter entered Florida City after the storm. There was hardly anyone — just damage.

“And then we came across the Goalcoast Mobile Home Park,” Waters said. “Outside the walls, you could tell the place was flattened. We found the entrance and went in and couldn’t find anyone at first … and saw in the distance some movement. So we went and tracked down Gary Davis, who was standing outside his mobile home wearing a plastic trash bag holding Boo Boo, one of his two chihuahuas.”

Gary Davis holding his chihu

The Palm Beach Post

Gary Davis holding his chihuahua after Hurricane Andrew

Waters said the photo is iconic as it shows the devastation caused by the hurricane and the daze on Davis’ face from surviving.

‘It looked like an atom bomb’: Hurricane Andrew’s impact on Homestead Air Force Base

Photojournalist John Lopinot placed other editors throughout Florida for the hurricane in order to be prepared for landfall. He shot damage from the air.

When WPBF 25 News Anchor Tiffany Kenney asked him if he had ever seen anything like it, he said, “No, and I had covered hurricanes all over for the paper and it was nothing like this.”

The flattened roofs, demolished roadways, snapped concrete polls, and destroyed houses were everywhere, Lopinot said.

Both photojournalists said the teamwork proved that they weren’t only a wonderful group of journalists, but also human beings.

Informational: 2022 WPBF 25 First Warning Weather Hurricane Survival Guide



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